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Application management as "Shared Service" for groups and corporations

The advantages are obvious: A centralized application management brings many advantages. Cost advantages are only one important part.

Are there also disadvantages to consider?

Case study:
A master car mechanic with a family is looking for a job in his region somewhere in Schleswig-Holstein. The master craftsman has a family and is therefore only mobile within a radius of 50 km.

The master craftsman knows a car dealership nearby which has been known and rooted in the region for decades. He wants to apply there.

He will find a link to the job exchange on the local website of the car dealership. There he looks for advertisements or a contact address in vain, with which he could apply. Instead, he is referred to an application management system via a link, which leads him to the group of companies to which the car dealership joined a few years ago.

He follows this link and finds himself on a page that represents a company with several thousand employees. He recognizes that the international group with headquarters abroad has a sheer incalculable number of jobs. Among dozens of options in several selection fields, he has to laboriously click his way through to find out whether the car dealership next door where he wants to apply has an open position. He is looking in vain for a simple way to make an unsolicited application for "his car dealership" or a local contact person.

The many options overtax him. Frustrated he breaks off his efforts and turns to other employers.

Is this fiction?

Unfortunately not! Many personnel managers in umbrella organizations and corporations forget what it is all about because they are so enthusiastic about "increasing efficiency" and "cutting costs" with their new, centralized application management! Namely to address the right applicants, to make it as easy as possible for them to apply and not to lose them to the competition. Cost aspects are only secondary after that!

It is not for nothing that established (house) brand names are retained, even if the regionally known company has long since been bought up. Why should this not apply to the local labour market?

The consequence

Local embedding and central processing!

This is simply the best of both worlds: Addressing applicants through regional brand use and still central processing of applications.There are good examples of companies that resolve the apparent contradiction. We will be happy to show you examples of best practice and accompany you in catching up with the best and solving your recruiting problem sustainably.